Remembering Leo Baxandale

MinnieMinxAs everyone in the British comics world will be all too aware, Leo Baxendale – creator of the Bash Street Kids, Minnie the Minx, Grimly Feendish, Sweeney Toddler and many other favourites – passed away last month.

I decided to pay tribute to him at WWAC wth a post about his mischievous schoolgirls: Minnie, Toots and Bad Penny. Particularly Minnie, the revered matriarch of the clan. Read the article here.

May 2017 Belladonna Issue Now Available! Plus: Introducing MIDNIGHT WIDOWS!

C_uEriJUIAEPZuQThis month’s issue of Belladonna is a special bumper-sized edition to mark our anniversary at the Horror Honeys. Inside you will find interviews, reviews and lifestyle columns focused on the nooks and crannies of the horror genre. My own article contributions are a review of Stephen Murphy and Mike Hawthorne’s grsphic novel Umbra and an overview of the delicious rivalry between kids’ cartoons and religious fundamentalists.

But the big news from my corner is that, this month, Belladonna begins serialising Midnight Widows: a comic I created in collaboration with artists Rosie Wigg and Marcela Hauptvogelova.

2017-05-13 18.58.12

So, pick up Belladonna at Magcloud, Magzter or our official website (with anniversary discount) and meet the Widows!

Fascist Ghosts Part Three

Hellblazer-Annual-Venus-of-the-Hardsell-illus-by-Dean-Motter-1-702x336

The final part of my article on how British horror fiction has portrayed the far right is now available to read at WWAC. Topics this time include a TV drama by Dennis Potter, a comic by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon, a short story by Kim Newman, an anthology by Nuzo Onoh, guest appearances from Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman and Sting, and musings over whether or not horror is an inherently reactionary genre (my conclusion tending towards the negative).

How I Spent April 2017

venusWell, April (with his shoures soot) has finished, the discounted Easter eggs have been snapped up from Co-Ops across the land, and the merry month of May is waiting in the wings. What have I been up to?

I’m happy to report that my comic project is soon to be unveiled: if all goes to plan, it will begin publication in June. It’s been a long time gestating, and having got thoroughly attached to the characters I’m looking forward to finally unleashing them upon the world.

In other news, the latest batch of Hugo finalists were announced this month. I’m preparing to review the prose categories for WWAC, and at the same time figuring out where to work the reviews into Monster Hunters, Dinosaur Lovers, my upcoming book about the fiction caught up in the Hugos/Puppies controversy.

N. K. Jemisin, John C. Wright and Seanan McGuire will each be getting their own chapter, so I know where to file their stories. Death’s End, Penric and the Shaman and “The Tomato Thief” are all sequels to works I’m already covering, so they’ll be easy enough to slot in. The presence of The Dream-Quest of Vellitt Boe and The Ballad of Black Tom, meanwhile, has made me go through with an idea I had been toying with for a while: giving an entire chapter to revisionist Lovecraftiana, a topic which I’m currently including in the horror chapter. Seeing that “Seasons of Glass and Iron” made the cut, it looks like I’ll be including a chapter on fairy tales as well, having previously gone back and forth on the notion.

In my weekly trips to the cinematograph I saw Kong: Skull Island, Power Rangers, Beauty and the Beast and… well, I did think of heading to Guardians of the Galaxy 2 and continue gutting myself upon Hollywood franchise blockbusters based on stuff we liked as kids. But instead, I decided to sample the British counterpart – cosy, nostalgic period dramas – and went to see Their Finest.

Articles of mine published elsewhere this month:

Article topics for May and beyond:

Mayandbeyond

Fascist Ghosts Part Two

SpearFeatured

The second instalment of my three-part essay on racism and portrayals of far right politics in British horror fiction is now live at WWAC. This time, I am focusing on the rise of the National Front in the 1970s and how it was represented in the work of two horror writers – the anti-fascist James Herbert, and the NF candidate David A. Riley.