Amazing Stories issue 27

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After a bit of a break, I’m back to doing my issue-by-issue Amazing Stories retrospective. This time I’m taking a trip to June 1928, where red planets, golden girls and blue dimensions are the hot topics of the month…

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Wrapping up the 2019 Hugos

 

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My series of Hugo Award reviews for WWAC draws to a close with a look at the final three contenders for Best Novel. Earth faces destruction three times — but at least we can still calculate stars, launch an Exodus fleet, or perhaps even take part in an intergalactic song contest…

How Chad Ripperger Showed me the Potential Benefits of Demonic Possession

Chad Ripperger

Lately I’ve been listening to YouTube sermons by Father Chad Ripperger where he talks about his experiences as an exorcist. They’re quite, erm, remarkableHere’s a typical excerpt where he talks about video games, Harry Potter, and people being prevented from entering the priesthood by Loki:

This witchcraft is finding itself not just among girls in Catholic high schools, it’s finding itself in video games. If you pay close attention to it, the guys making the video games today are doing their research. They are digging up these ancient gods, which are just another name for demons as we can read in the Old Testament and New Testament and from my personal experience too, all the gods of gentiles are demons, and I can testify that. I’ve seen Baal, which is mentioned in scripture, Asmodeus, Isis, Osiris, the guy named Loki who’s out there today, by the way, who interestingly, Loki – if this gives you any indication of the stronghold he gets – he’s the demon who goes around seeking people who have religious and priestly vocations to neglect entering those.

It’s even in the video games, and even in some of the other games, they’re actually happening where you have to actually cast real spells, these guys are digging up real spells and casting them in the process of this, this even goes – and I’ll just answer now, because someone’s going to ask the question ‘what about Harry Potter?’ Okay, It was expunged from the Internet, as soon as I saw  it I ran to the Internet and grabbed it, and I made a copy of it somewhere in my files. Basically J. K. Rowling wrote Harry Potter, she did the entire Harry Potter series by auto-writing, and auto-writing is a form of diabolic channeling.  I’m not accusing her of thinking this is done, that she’s using diabolic channeling. She went to witch school. Real witches will testify that the actual spells in Harry Potter are real spells, unlike Tolkien, who uses it as a literary device.

Continue reading “How Chad Ripperger Showed me the Potential Benefits of Demonic Possession”

How I Spent July 2019

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Well, that was a scorcher of a month. Despite the sun beating down on me like a big glowing jerk, I managed to get quite a bit done. For one thing, my TV tie-in novel has passed the halfway mark, and I’m looking forward to getting a complete draft done over the next two or three months.

Next up, I’m proud to have become a guest author for the lovely Horror After Dark blog, which kindly agreed to run my five-part series reviewing each and every finalist for this year’s Splatterpunk Awards; links are below. I’ve also been cracking on with my Hugo reviews for WWAC; I should be finished early in August — and with both the Splats and the Hugos done and dusted, I’ll find myself with a chunk of free time.

How will I spend it? Well, I have a few projects in mind…

Articles of mine published elsewhere this month:

Article topics for August and beyond:

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2019 Splatterpunk Awards: Wrapping up the Reviews

Splatty Horror After Dark has just run the fifth and final post in my guest series where I review each and every one of the 2019 Splatterpunk Award finalists!

With Best Short Story, Best NovellaBest Collection and Best Anthology. all that remains is Best Novel. And here it is: the complete category reviewed for your pleasure.

Yet again, a content warning is probably necessary, since the Spatterpunk Awards celebrate extreme horror and some of the novels I’m talking about are indeed pretty extreme in their subject matter.